Lucas Brearley

An image of Lucas Brearley provisional psychologist with Therapy Pro

Psychologist (provisional)

Melbourne

  • Works with adults
  • Works with children

As a provisional psychologist, Lucas Brearley’s number one priority is the improvement of people’s lives 

Lucas knows firsthand the positive impact talking with a psychologist can have on how you feel and the way it can help change your outlook on life. 

“A good psychologist can help their clients work through the many thoughts and emotions they are experiencing and help them to understand the intricacies of their own psychology better. They can motivate their clients to engage in therapy and inspire an active journey towards improved wellbeing.”  

People go through different stages of life that can test them mentally, but Lucas believes in the recovery that can happen, often people just need the right support at the right time. 

Lucas works across the age range, volunteering his time at Beyond Blue as a public speaker and at Family Drug Help on their helpline. Lucas can work with people that present with anxiety, low self-esteem, depression, and write Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) plans and provide PBS training for support staff.  

Lucas approaches sessions from a place of growth and believes in the merit of encouraging clients to challenge themselves, to the furthest extent possible, to enable learning, increased self-awareness and personal change. 

As a mobile therapist, Lucas can meet people in their own environment, where they feel comfortable and have more control over the session to make it what they need it to be. 

“I like to find the strength in people and most importantly, help them to identify it and know it’s there for when needed. So, when they’re feeling vulnerable or overwhelmed with a situation, they have tools they can use to harness that strength, in that time.” 

Lucas is enrolled in the College of Professional Psychology and is an associate member of the APS. He is a graduate of the Australian Catholic University and the Institute for Social Neuroscience 

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